0800 093 2520 BroadbandDeals.co.uk is an Ofcom Accredited broadband comparison site BroadbandDeals.co.uk is an Ofcom Accredited broadband comparison site Expert advice 8am - 9pm
Google requested to remove 2.4m URLs under Right to be Forgotten EU law

Google moves closer to encrypted web

As part of Google’s ongoing strategy for an encrypted web, Chrome will now mark all HTTP pages that do not display the green secure lock with a red ‘Not Secure’ warning.

As far back as 2014 Google had proposed that Chrome would initially mark HTTP pages serving password fields or credit card interactions as ‘Not Secure’ and promised to move to similarly mark all unencrypted pages.

By this month more than 93% of the traffic across Google resources were being served over an encrypted connection. This in comparison to 50% in 2014.

The wider adoption of HTTPs, around 75% of the pages loaded via Chrome are now served by HTTP, means that Google is ready to push towards complete elimination of unencrypted connections. Just three years ago around 40% of the loaded pages were using HTTPs.

For the past several years, we’ve moved towards a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt HTTP encryption. And within the last year, we’ve helped users to understand that HTTP sites are not secure by gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as ‘not secure.’

Previously, HTTP usage was too high to mark all HTTP pages with a strong red warning but in October 2018 (Chrome 70), we’ll start showing the red ‘not secure’ warning when users enter data on HTTP pages.

Users should expect that the web is safe by default, and they’ll be warned when there’s an issue. Since we’ll soon start marking all HTTP pages as ‘not secure’, we’ll step towards removing Chrome’s positive security indicators so that the default unmarked state is secure.

We hope these changes continue to pave the way for a web that’s easy to use safely, by default. HTTP is cheaper and easier than ever before, and unlocks powerful capabilities, so don’t wait to migrate to HTTPs.

- Emily Schechter: Product Manager, Chrome Security

The latest announcements are part of Google’s push for more webmasters to adopt HTTPs as a secure encryption standard for data in transit.

This means any data from your computer to a website is transmitted securely and is protected from attackers.

HTTP wraps a secure tunnel around a site and its user while the encryption also serves to ensure the content hasn’t been modified by any attacker.

Google is not the only internet company to push for the adoption of HTTPs. WordPress started offering free HTTPs to all hosted websites, while Amazon is offering free security certificates to AWS customers.

By:

A veteran freelance journalist writing extensively on internet news and cybersecurity.
Back To Top